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March 1, 2019

In a DAY’s Work

Jason Day’s pre-round warm-up routine

Interview by Garrett Johnston

Golf Range Magazine: How does your pre-round warm-up start?

Jason Day: Whether I have a morning or afternoon tee time, I warm my body up by doing mobility exercises first before I even get to the golf course. When I’m done, instead of starting on short game, I always start at the range. And I start with lob wedges and work my way up.

GRM: What does working your way up through the bag look like?

Day: I typically try and hit a straight shot, a fade, and draw. I start with a flighted shot, which is a half-shot first and then full shot fade, straight, draw. After wedges I go to 9 iron, 7 iron, 5 iron, 3 iron or 2 iron depending on what course I’m playing. I’ll do the shot shapes on every iron. Then I go 3-wood and driver. I typically I don’t try to move them around too much, I just try to hit those straight and throw in a couple fades if that’s what the course mainly calls for. I then leave the range and move on to chipping and bunker work for 15 minutes, then putting.

GRM: What does your practice putting routine consist of, and how long is it usually?

Day: Putting typically is about 10 minutes. It’s not much. I start off with long putts, and that could vary from 30 feet to 60 feet. I’m just trying to get a feel for the green. After about five minutes of that I go to 10 foot putts. I start with right to left putts and then go left to right. The next one will be downhill left to right and the next one is uphill right to left. It will vary, and I will hit a certain amount of 10 footers.

GRM: Is there a certain overall amount of putts you need to hit in your session?

Day: No, I never have a certain amount of putts I want to hit. After 10 footers I then go to the six-foot range and do the exact same thing and then 3 foot and do the exact same thing. I always make sure I start the ball on line and I’m trying to get the speed just right as it’s entering the hole. If I can do that I know that my speed will be really good out on the golf course. If I can walk away confidently knowing that I’m starting the putts where I need to, then I can just go out and play some golf.